Book Review Rich Dad Poor Dad a Book by Robert Kiyosaki

Book Review: Rich Dad Poor Dad a Book by Robert T. Kiyosaki

Book Review of Rich Dad Poor Dad by Robert Kiyosaki talks about, money is the most essential commodity for the functioning of an individual. Some people may also equate money with not only survival but also happiness.

Money is a factor that majorly defines our living standards and also our purchasing capacity. However, we all know that human wants are endless, and therefore one’s need for money may also be endless. 

This book titled, “Rich Dad, Poor Dad”, brilliantly written by author Robert T. Kiyosaki is a phenomenal body of work that is going to make us unlearn many false facets about money and deconstruct a whole system of belief regarding it. But this book is not only about money. It is also about how we are taught to think about it.

How the society around us, that is schools, family, friends, and peers, make us perceive money. This book is an attempt, and rather a successful one, to rejuvenate and reactivate our thought process toward money-making and exemplifies the need for the same. 

Rich Dad, Poor Dad is Robert’s story of growing up with two dads; his real father and the father of his best friend. Robert Kiyosaki draws a subconscious parallel story about how the two dads shaped his thoughts about money and investing.

The book explodes the myth that you need to earn a high income to be rich and explains the difference between working for money and having your money work for you. Surely an interesting concept to navigate. 

As the readers dive into the universe of this book, they will discover the author to be candid, insightful, and retrospective. It explodes the myth that you need to earn a high income to become rich and it challenges numerous beliefs that your house is an asset.

It also explains why the schooling system is not reliable in inculcating the knowledge and value of money in kids. This book offers an interesting elucidation on assets and liability. It also lays the principles that may help a person in ensuring their financial success in the future.

This book is full of so many intriguing and interesting quotations that are enough to tease your brain into thinking about them long after you finish reading it. Some of them are; 

“There is a difference between being poor and being broke. Broke is temporary. Poor is eternal.”

“An asset puts money in my pocket. A liability takes money out of my pocket.” 

“When you own something, it is either putting money into your pockets or taking money out of your pockets. Owning a business or earning royalties creates income. Owning a house and a car incurs expenses.”

“Try to own things that put money in your pocket.”

“If you rely on earning a wage or salary to put money in your pocket, you will be forever caught up in the vicious cycle of needing money, earning money, and spending money.”

“Winners are not afraid of losing. But losers are. Failure is part of the process of success. People who avoid failure also avoid success.”

Over a period of two decades, Ric Dad, Poor Dad, has made its permanent mark in the world. It is one of the highest-selling books of all time. It is motivational. It is retrospective. It is inspirational. It is educative.

It is almost like a bible that explains the importance, necessity, means, and measures to understand, accumulate, generate and invest the most important social commodity in the lives of mankind, that is, money.

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Focusing on Literature and Lifestyle of the Urban Youth of the Country, LitGleam is a monthly magazine, an intrinsic part of BlueRose Publishers.

Within its pages, our readers find provocative essays on literature and lifestyle, guidance for getting published and pursuing writing careers, in-depth profiles of poets, fiction writers, and writers of creative nonfiction, and conversations among fellow professionals.

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